Utility Master Planning
  

DO ALL ENGINEERING FIRMS OFFER THE SAME SERVICES?
Our team members have operated food facilities, designed utility systems, and managed the utilities for top fortune 100 Food & Beverage companies in United States.  In fact, our in-house master planning team has worked in all phases of the utilities life cycle in the food & beverage industry. We consider ourselves a leader in this field, because we have been focused on master planning even before efficient, sustainable, reliable and Green solutions were in demand.

WHAT IS THE GOAL OF MASTER PLANNING?
Our utility master planning team specializes in developing cost effective strategies for utility systems, infrastructure, growth, and energy. Our goal is to always minimize operating cost and offer our customers a competitive advantage.  We do this by focusing on the synergy of opportunities between utilities, efficiencies, sustainability, and integrating of the utility systems we provide you.
With an Integrated Master Planning Approach as our core focus, the traditional engineering methodologies are being challenged. Our years of experience in design and operation of ammonia refrigeration, boilers, compressed air and other mechanical utilities will allow us to provide you with an Integrated Approach to Utility Master Planning which will in turn minimize energy consumption & maintenance cost, and improve system reliability and ease of operation.

WHAT IS AN INTEGRATED MASTER PLANNING APPROACH?
Integrated Master Planning Approach is a holistic approach to all the utilities in a Food and Beverage facility.  We specialize in all aspects of a Food & Beverage facility and understand the traditional utilities such as process waste, heat recovery, refrigeration, boiler & steam, compressed air, and process support utilities (CO2, N2, CO, and more).  Often, plant utilities are designed on an ad hoc basis and the opportunities of the entire spectrum of utilities are not fully used by the design engineers.
For example: it is common in the Food & Beverage Industry to outsource the refrigeration to a specialty refrigeration firm, boilers to another firm, and process system to a completely different firm. Therefore, the designs are compartmentalized and the potential opportunity of using one utility to optimize the other utility is not captured.

WHY INVEST IN UTILITY MASTER PLANNING?
In today’s competitive economy, planning for the future is the decisive way to get an advantage over competitors.  When it comes to utilities and infrastructure the preparation of a Utility Master Plan is essential.  Early decision making can pay big dividends on capital projects and speed to mark for new product delivery. This is evident when only minimal infrastructure changes are required.  Through this process, we streamline the details on future utilities (Process Heat recovery, refrigeration capacity, regulatory limitations such as PSM & RMP, etc.) which save on capital and long term operational costs.  Knowing these details in advance is the key and we are prepared to deliver.
The success of many process facilities depends on the performance of the utility system.

Utility Master Planning will allow owners to benefit from:
  • Assured performance of utility systems in line with design specification
  • System available capacity for expansion or lack of capacity
  • Maintain ROI of efficiency investment
  • Less production downtime
  • Reduced energy cost
  • Lower maintenance cost
  • Improved worker safety
  • Bottom-line increase in productivity, with lower operating cost
  • Identify system problems in advance
  • Meeting Business Goals

ENERGY AUIDTS/SURVEY FOR UTILTIY MASTER PALNNING
An Energy audit is key to developing a Utility Master Planning. Although energy audits have various degrees of complexity and can vary widely from one industry to another, every audit typically involves:
  • Data collection and review of system design documents & utility bills
  • Plant surveys and utility systems measurements
  • Observation and review of operating practices
  • Data analysis
  • Determination of system capacities and deficiencies
  • Identification of energy saving opportunities

In short, the audit is designed to determine where, when, why, and how energy is being used, how efficiently is used, and how the system operates. The energy audit is a systematic assessment of Current energy-use practices, from point of purchase to point of end use. The audit identifies how energy is handled and consumed. The key steps in an energy audit are as follows:
  • Conduct condition report- Asses general condition of equipment, operational practices and impact on utility usage.
  • Establish audit mandate- Define expectation and outcome of the audit.
  • Establish scope- Define the energy –consuming utilities to be planned and audited.
  • Determine energy performance- Determine energy use indices and compare them internally from one period to another and to best practices.
  • Profile energy use patterns-Determine the time relationships of energy use, such as the electricity demand profile.
  • Inventory energy use- Prepare a list of all energy consuming loads, measure their consumption, and demand characteristics.
  • Identify Energy management opportunities- Include operation and technological measures to reduce energy cost.
  • Asses the benefits- Measure energy cost saving, cost to implement, and ROI.
  • Identify utility system capacities- Outline utility system capacities and deficiencies.
  • Report for action- Report finding, align with client, and plan for implementation.
  
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ENERGY AUIDTS/SURVEY FOR UTILTIY MASTER PALNNING
Utility Master Planning
  
COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM PLANNIG
Compressed air one of the principal forms of energy used in industrial processes. It is often the most expensive when evaluated on a per unit energy delivered basis, and yet it is often inadequately designed, compressors poorly located, and operation requirements neglected.  In addition, compressed air systems typically develop operational issues and air leaks as they age. For example, 22% of all compressed air generated in United States is typically lost through leaks, according to U.S. Department of Energy studies. Utility Master Planning will benefit the compressed air system as follows:
  • Survey of the air system equipment and piping
  • Identifying system capacity
  • Identifying system efficiency
  • Identifying energy saving opportunities
  • Potentially identifying system leaks
  
Utility Master Planning

BOILER & STEAM SYSTEM PLANNIG
A steam audit can take several days to complete, depending on the size of the facility. A facility need not shut down for the procedure; it’s actually better that it continue as usual so the auditor can easily spot steam leaks and other anomalies during daily operations.

During a boiler room audit, an auditor will check the boiler controls, the boiler, blowdown and feed water conditioning to identify inefficiency issues. Auditors do an inventory of key equipment, looking for:
  •  Energy-saving methods
  • Areas to implement better engineering practices
  • Health and safety concerns
  
Check equipment in the boiler room with focuses on potential improvements throughout the energy-using facility. The evaluator inspects the
  
  • Boiler, steam flow, pressures, temperatures, air handling,
  • Steam trapping, piping ancillaries including valving and insulation, condensate handling.
  • Identifying steam leaks
  • Heat recovery
  • Utilization of flash steam
  • Return of condensate


Utility Master Planning
  
INDUSTRIAL REFRIGERATION SYSTEM PLANNIG
Refrigeration is a major consumer of electricity in an industrial facility. For example, refrigeration is the largest
electrical load and is accounted for the bulk of energy related cost in most food processing and distribution facilities. Typically, industrial refrigeration systems are large vapor compression systems that mostly utilize ammonia or CO2 and R-507. These systems are prime candidates for targeted programs to improve their performance and efficiency.
Industrial refrigeration systems are generally field-erected custom engineered refrigeration systems comprised of separate components provided by different original equipment manufacturers. The individual components for each system must be carefully selected and integrated by both the refrigeration design engineer and mechanical contractor to achieve the desired performance and efficiency.
Our refrigeration system audit and planning will allow the facility owners to better understand the current state of their equipment and offer the following benefits:
  • Decrease energy use and cost
  • Increase production
  • Improve product quality
  • Maximizes equipment life and capital utilization
  • Minimizes environmental impact (EPA)
  • Reduces accidents (OSHA PSM)
  
  
PROCESS HEAT RECOVERY AND GREEN INTITATIVES
It doesn’t make sense to waste more heat than necessary, yet this is exactly what happens on many process plants. Waste heat is energy which ends up in the environment rather than the product. Some process plants have a considerable number of waste heat flows such as:
  • Boiler plant stacks
  • Cooling towers
  • Dryer exhausts
  • Flash steam from condensate tanks
  • Process heater, fryers. Ovens, and etc.
There are many other examples. In most cases the heat originates from fuel which has been paid for – reducing the waste reduces both fuel cost and CO2 emissions.

REDUCING WASTE HEAT
Broadly speaking there are three main aspects of waste heat reduction.
  • Operate the process on a right first time basis
    • it is very wasteful to make off-specification product or to process the same material more than once, especially for energy intensive operations such as drying
  • Minimize heat demand of the underlying process
    • Maximize the efficiency of thermal utility systems, Example: optimize burners, boilers, steam systems etc.
    • More fundamentally and longer term, develop less energy intensive ways of making the product and/or less energy intensive products to meet the same customer needs.
  • Heat recovery
    • reuse waste heat instead of steam or fuel to carry out other heating duties

A FOCUS ON HEAT RECOVERY
In an age of increasing fuel prices and growing concern about the environment, process industries can no
longer afford not to optimize heat recovery on their sites.
  
KEY HEAT RECOVERY QUESTIONS FOR ALL PROCESS PLANTS
  • How much heat recovery is possible?
  • Is there use for the recovered heat?
  • What are the best heat sources and sinks to use?
  • What types of heat exchangers are most appropriate?
  • Will the heat recovery make the process harder to control?
  • How will heat recovery affect the site CHP system?
  • How much will it cost?
  
HOW DO OUR FOOD CLIENTS BENEFIT FROM A UTILITY MASTER PLANNING?
  • Awareness on total utility usage and cost
  • Offers data & information for utility system capacity assessment, expansion, and capital expenditure.
  • Identifies compliance to regulatory requirements or lack of it.
  • Increases bottom line by making informed decision!
  
Utility Master Planning